Wednesday, February 15, 2006

Marx, Postmodernism and Blogging

One of the things thats been troubling me lately is whether there are any classist/nationalist implications for blogging especially in the economic sphere. Then I wondered whether postmodern interpretations might help. I ended up in the works of Fellini, where a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. Lyotard uses the term ‘nationalism’ to denote the common ground between class and society. In a sense, many discourses concerning subcapitalist theory exist.

The primary theme of Werther’s analysis of the subdeconstructivist paradigm of expression is the economy, and some would say the collapse, of deconstructive sexual identity. Sartre uses the term ‘nationalism’ to denote a self-sufficient whole. It could be said that Baudrillard promotes the use of the subdeconstructivist paradigm of expression to deconstruct class.
“Society is intrinsically impossible,” says Lyotard. The subject is contextualised into a nationalism that includes sexuality as a totality. Therefore, Debord’s model of the neocultural paradigm of consensus states that reality, somewhat ironically, has significance, but only if nationalism is valid.


In the works of Fellini, a predominant concept is the concept of textual language. The main theme of the works of Fellini is the difference between sexual identity and class. However, Sartre suggests the use of neocapitalist conceptualist theory to attack sexism.

“Sexual identity is part of the fatal flaw of consciousness,” says Marx; however, according to la Tournier, it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the fatal flaw of consciousness, but rather the absurdity, and eventually the failure, of sexual identity. Bataille uses the term ‘precultural nihilism’ to denote a mythopoetical whole. In a sense, any number of narratives concerning the role of the reader as participant may be found.


To come full circle, Derrida promotes the use of nationalism to analyse and modify class. Thus, Marx uses the term ‘Sontagist camp’ to denote the common ground between art and society.

And it leads me to think that blogging is a part of creating this common ground - a nexus if you like between art and a more profoungly sociological statement. Its all rather mindblowing - I suppose I could be wrong.

9 comments:

Rhett said...

That is quite brilliant.

I wholeheartedly agree with the sentiment.

BJ said...

Its astonishing when you think about it...

Rhett said...

And all I do is talk about music...

You put me to shame.

servant said...

Lyotard? I wonder what you'd look like in one.....

It's interesting in light of what you've said (not sure whether it's serious or just an intellectual taking of the mickey.... but I'm going to run with it) to note the nature of anarchy that seems to be present on the internet. It has a nature that swings towards anti-establishment and deconstruction. Of course as corporations gain more hold of it, it maintains this feel but it becomes more of a corporate facade.

Blogging is the extension and propagation of it. It breaks down class by reducing people to text on a virtual page. But in another sense it could be seen as constructing a whole new class system of its own, measured by "hits" and comments.

If art is merely the expression of ideas (as Marcus Lush states ;o)), then blogging is certainly a high form of art and since the expression of ideas flows forth from units within society then yes, it becomes also, a sociological statement.

BJ said...

I think you said it a lot more clearly than I did

Rhett said...

Well put. What more can I say?

BJ said...

Thanks to "Postmodern Generator" for this random assembling of postmodern theory using word association programming...

To be fair I did supply the intro and ending...

servant said...

I knew it was something like that ;o) Hence my comment about an intellectual taking of the mickey. But the intro and ending was what I was rolling off with what I said. I didn't really understand the rest.

BJ said...

I can't help myself...it actually started to make some kind of sense once I bookended it...

Good fun though ;)